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Thread: Your 2012/2013 Toronto Raptors

  1. #61
    Raptors Republic Hall of Famer Matt52's Avatar
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    Quote sleepz wrote: View Post
    I would like it if a real GM was hired and came in and tried to build this team properly next year, however I can't escape the feeling that Colangelo will get one more shot at continuing to mismanage the Toronto Raptors.
    Raps are younger deeper and better.

    What more would you have done or expected?

    Outside of Jose all players that truly matter are 27 and under.

  2. #62
    Raptors Republic Hall of Famer Matt52's Avatar
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    And there is still 3 months to training camp.

  3. #63
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    Quote Matt52 wrote: View Post
    Superstars and even all-stars are incredibly difficult to obtain.

    Having a realistic perspective on the matter I cannot understand the unhappiness from posters. The Raps got younger, deeper, and better. The players obtained fit Casey's system much bEtter as well.

    If superstars and all stars were easy to obtain everyone would have multiple.
    They are not easy to obtain, however if we know that these are the type of players needed to create a winner, the top GM's and the type of GM you want running your franchise has to find ways to acquire them via draft, trade or free agency.

    Colangelo has been here 7 YEARS and has not managed to acquire an all-star or even a player approaching all-star talent. He has managed to let a perennial all-star leave and not get anything back for him but his acquisitions have primarily been swapping out average players for other average players.

    If thats the type of GM you want then so be it.

    Some posters here want to see a plan of action to start acquiring players that are going to help you win long-term.

    This is a results driven league and in very few places would a GM be given 7 years to build something of significance and be at the level the Raptor franchise is at now. The roster is 'meh' at best.

  4. #64
    Raptors Republic Superstar Chr1s1anL's Avatar
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    Great Article on Landry Fields comparing him from college to the pros

    After looking at his profile on Draftexpress I think that Fields has ideal size for the SF. He measured in at 6'6.5" without shoes. Unfortunately they don't have measurements in shoes but, I would guess that make him around 6'7.75"-6'8" in shoes. He was 216 lbs when he got drafted but, he has noticeably gotten bigger. Also he measure with an impressive 6'9.5" wingspan and 8'8.5" standing reach.
    http://www.draftexpress.com/profile/Landry-Fields-5803/

    Rookie Retrospective: Landry Fields
    December 27, 2010
    Joe Treutlein

    Landry Fields, 6-7, SG/SF, New York Knicks
    10.5 points, 7.6 rebounds, 1.9 assists, 1.1 steals, 1.4 turnovers, 52% FG, 74% FT, 39% 3PT

    Undoubtedly the biggest surprise of any player from the 2010 NBA Draft, Landry Fields has been an integral part of the New York Knicks' early success, starting every one of their 30 games and in many minds, being the second best rookie in the league to date.

    Drafted 39th by the Knicks after not being projected to be picked at all by most services, Fields is certainly a player who “fell through the cracks” somewhere in the evaluation process.

    Younger than most players in his class, he saw very little playing time as a freshman and sophomore at Stanford, and didn't do very much to draw attention to himself when he started playing more in his junior season.

    By the time he did start producing as a senior, he was putting up big numbers in what was deemed to be a very weak Pac-10 conference, and wasn't really on anyone's scouting list to start the season.

    Fields wasn't considered more than a fringe prospect for most NBA teams even after his excellent senior season, as evidenced by him not being one of the 53 prospects invited to the official NBA Pre-Draft Camp and Combine--usually a kiss of death for non-International players.

    Fields did play at the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament, but barely stood out, not being one of the 12 players (none of whom are currently in the NBA) named to the all-tournament team. He didn't even lead his team in scoring. That honor went to Morgan State's Reggie Holmes, a PIT all-tournament selection, who is now playing in Morocco of all places.

    Considering where he started and where he is now, Fields' case might be the most unlikely we've seen in the seven NBA drafts we've covered.



    Part One: The Importance of Role

    Then:

    “As Stanford's clear-cut first option, Fields has been an extremely consistent performer for Head Coach Johnny Dawkins through the first few months of the season, posting less than 21 points in only one game thus far, while also leading his team in rebounds and steals.

    Fields has blossomed into a major mismatch threat at the college level due to his big wingspan, solid athleticism, and ability to play both inside and outside. However, standing just 6-7 and falling a bit between positions, Fields still has a lot to prove to NBA scouts regarding his pro potential.

    After serving a complementary role next to Lawrence Hill last season, Fields is the feature player in Stanford's offensive sets, with almost a quarter of his touches coming in pure isolation situations according to the data we have at our disposal.”
    -NCAA Weekly Performers, December 31, 2009

    Now:

    In comparing the role Fields played in college to how he has fit in on the Knicks, there really is very little comparison at all, and that alone is a major reason why many people did not see this kind of success coming.

    Possibly the biggest change is that of position, where Fields played the 4 in college and was projected as a combo-forward by many scouts, yet he's seen almost all his minutes on the wing in the pros, being a 2/3 if not a pure 2 in many lineups.

    While he would've been at a disadvantage from a size, strength, and athleticism standpoint at power forward, his size and strength actually becomes advantage at the shooting guard spot, while he did a good job filling out his frame substantially and maximizing his athleticism over the summer, making him much more attractive in that regard as well.

    The data on his isolations alone also tell much of the story, with 148 of his 596 possessions his senior year being of the isolation variety (24.8%), compared to just 23 of 299 in the pros (7.7%).

    Fields has literally gone from first to fifth option in his team's starting lineup, and it's made a world of difference in his efficiency and effectiveness, despite the much increased level of competition.

    Not really having the advanced ball-handling skills or elite speed to excel in isolation situations, Fields is much more comfortable playing off the ball the way he does with the Knicks, where his offensive duties consist primarily of spreading the floor, knocking down open shots, making flow-of-the-offense passes, and crashing the offensive glass, all of which he has done an exceptional job of.

    When Fields is forced to take his man off the dribble, it's often in an up-tempo situation or off a quick series of swing passes around the floor, which means his defender usually isn't fully set in his stance, making him more effective on his forays to the rim. That's not to say role is the only reason he's succeeding however, as Fields certainly brings a plethora of valuable skills to the table, starting with his outside shooting.

    Part Two: Perimeter Shooting

    Then:

    “Though Fields has proven to be a high caliber scorer, he is still not a finished product offensively, especially with the polish he shows from the perimeter. When he isn't able to get close enough to the rim to utilize his floater, he struggles mightily with his pull-up jump shot, displaying a lack of fluidity in his form and a low release point. In contrast, Fields is a passable shooter from a standstill, displaying solid range and the ability to make shots with a hand in his face, a nice tool for him on the occasions that he faces up in the post.”
    -NCAA Weekly Performers, December 31, 2009

    Now:

    Possibly the most important area of his game in terms of how he's managed to succeed so quickly, Fields' catch-and-shoot ability from NBA three-point range has been a major part of why his own (and the Knicks') offense have managed to be so successful this season.

    The interesting thing about his shooting is despite the NBA three-point line being a few feet deeper than the college three-point line and despite going up against much tougher defenders every night, Fields' 38.7% shooting from three is a higher number than any of his four years in college. As a college senior for example he shot just 33.7% from beyond the arc. He's also making more 3-pointers per game than he did in any of his four years at Stanford, which is something you rarely see.

    With this, of course, it's important to look a little deeper, as once again the importance of role has a large impact on how his numbers have improved. According to Synergy Sports Technology, Fields is actually scoring an identical 1.15 points per shot on catch-and-shoot opportunities in the pros as he did in college. The difference in his overall numbers is actually coming as a result of the type of shots he's taking, with him now taking a significantly higher percentage of shots spotting up as compared to off the dribble.

    In his senior year, Fields took 73 catch-and-shoot jumpers compared to 67 off the dribble, whereas in the pros he's taken 65 catch-and-shoot compared to just 12 off the dribble. With him scoring an abysmal 0.5 points per shot with off the dribble jumpers, this has been a major boon to his overall efficiency.

    In looking at his shooting abilities, Fields is a perfect fit for Mike D'Antoni's Seven Seconds or Less offense, as he has a high and quick release, excellent balance even when on the move, and is extremely disciplined and intelligent in always spacing the floor, staying put behind the arc, and moving to where the offense needs him most.



    Part Three: Off-The-Dribble Offense

    Then:

    “Displaying a solid first step, nice ball-handling ability, and a knack for using his length and smarts effectively to get his shot off over defenders, Fields is a tough cover for small forwards, let alone the occasional four-man that steps out to defend him. Able to attack the basket and finish with either hand, he looks equally comfortable driving after facing up in the mid-post or operating from the perimeter. Using jabs and jump-stops very effectively, displaying a nice floater, and showing toughness and creativity around the rim, Fields does an excellent job of creating scoring chances on the interior, as his outstanding 8.6 free-throw attempts per-contest indicate.”
    -NCAA Weekly Performers, December 31, 2009

    Now:

    While Fields hasn't done much in terms of shooting off the dribble in the pros, something he struggled with heavily as a collegiate, he does still do a fair amount of damage attacking off the dribble, though only in a way conducive to his strengths.

    Fields actually is getting to the rim a more than a decent amount thus far, with him having 93 shots around the basket compared to just 83 jump shots in the halfcourt setting according to Synergy Sports Technology. While many of these opportunities come on offensive rebounds and off-the-ball cuts, Fields also does a good job on quick catch-and-drive opportunities where he can take advantage of his defender rotating from out of position.

    Not having elite reactiveness or quickness with the ball, Fields gets by with rangy strides, good body control, and not deviating much from straight-line drives. His straight-line speed is actually pretty good for his size, however, while he has a size and strength advantage over most defenders he faces, both of which in combination with excellent touch contribute to him being a good finisher in the lane.

    Fields is also very disciplined in not trying to attack in situations other than quick catch-and-drives, as his athleticism and ball-handling skills don't allow him to do nearly as well in isolation opportunities, where his defender is in stance with his hips squared, something he's not usually capable of getting past.

    Part Four: Passing, Rebounding, and Basketball IQ

    Then:

    “Aside from his ability to put points on the board, Fields impacts the game in a number of other ways. A capable passer and rebounder, Fields displays a good basketball IQ, and while he's not looking to make passes when he puts the ball on the floor, he shows good court vision and will hit the open cutter and deliver crisp passes back out to the perimeter when defenders collapse to deny his penetration.”
    -NCAA Weekly Performers, December 31, 2009

    Now:

    Possibly the most underrated aspect of Fields' game as a draft prospect, his overall intelligence and approach to the game has been critical in his early success, as he's played much more like a 10-year veteran than a rookie in his first 30 games in the league. Fields truly embodies the term “glue guy” in that his contributions and positioning on the offensive end really go a long way towards making things easier for the other players on the floor, a big reason he has the highest +/- on the Knicks by a wide margin according to 82games.com.

    Frequently setting up on the wing behind the three-point arc in the halfcourt and in transition, Fields provides floor spacing with his perimeter shooting and an excellent passing cog on swings around the floor, especially considering his extremely high degree of unselfishness and good decision-making. This likewise shows up when he starts attacking the basket, as virtually all of his dribble-drives fall into one of two categories: a straight-line drive all the way to the rim or two dribbles and a kick out to the open man behind the arc because the lane shut down.

    The other area Fields make a substantial contribution is on the glass, as his extremely high 7.6 rebounds per game suggest. Taking minutes and pace into account, Fields is actually rebounding at nearly the same rate in the pros as in college despite a move from the frontcourt to the wing, though being on a team that frequently plays small-ball lineups certainly helps him out there.

    Regardless, his prowess on the glass is by no means a fluke, as his nose for the ball is as good as anyone's, with him constantly running full speed for the ball the moment it bounces off the rim. Despite not being the quickest or most reactive athlete, this is actually one area where Fields is above average, as his straight line-speed and momentum-driven leaping ability when uncontested is quite good, something that shows up very evidently in these situations.

    Part Five: Defense

    Then:

    “Defensively, Fields successfully uses his length to make an impact in the passing lanes and contest shots. Displaying active hands and a good effort level overall, Fields ranks amongst the top-20 players in steals per-game in our database. Though he doesn't have outstanding lateral quickness, he doesn't get beat off the dribble too often on the NCAA level, and shows good discipline forcing his defender to drive into help and pursuing the ball aggressively off the rim after shots go up.”
    -NCAA Weekly Performers, December 31, 2009

    Now:

    Defying his doubters in the pros just as he did in college, Fields continues to more than hold his own on the defensive end despite not having the quickest of feet, being the rare NBA wing who can turn himself into an average to above-average defender despite a lack of great athletic tools. Fields' fundamental base, effort level, and positioning are all outstanding, and the area he surprisingly excels most in is isolations, taking full advantage of the opportunity to get his hips set and in front of his man, rarely being blown by off the dribble. His length helps him out greatly here, as does his massively improved frame, something that has made his transition to the wing easier than expected.

    Fields does tend to struggle in other ways, however, not really doing a good job getting around screens either running off the ball or in the pick-and-roll game, though he makes up for it partly with positioning and hustle.

    In terms of team defense, he's everything a coach can ask for, constantly keeping his head up watching both his man and the ball, running across the floor to contest open shots, crashing the defensive glass, and always maintaining good position.

    Outlook:

    Playing for the perfect coach in the perfect role for his skill set, Landy Fields has gotten himself into a great situation for his future, and he should continue to thrive if not improve even more if the situation remains the same. While he may not have had as much success on another team, it's quite clear talent evaluators (ourselves included) sold him short in many areas as a prospect, and it doesn't appear his early success is a fluke. While he likely will never be more than a great role player, Fields can still continue to improve with his shooting and ball-handling, while more experience can only make him a smarter player than he already is.

    From DraftExpress.com http://www.draftexpress.com#ixzz210NKzh5z
    http://www.draftexpress.com
    @Chr1st1anL

  5. #65
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    Like who did you realistically think the raptors were going to get (and who would you have given up for them) - we got more talent this offseason and our "core" will improve during the offseason - I just don't understand you farewhether fans assuming he could have gotten Gay for JJ & ED and just said no

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    Quote Chr1s1anL wrote: View Post
    Great Article on Landry Fields comparing him from college to the pros

    After looking at his profile on Draftexpress I think that Fields has ideal size for the SF. He measured in at 6'6.5" without shoes. Unfortunately they don't have measurements in shoes but, I would guess that make him around 6'7.75"-6'8" in shoes. He was 216 lbs when he got drafted but, he has noticeably gotten bigger. Also he measure with an impressive 6'9.5" wingspan and 8'8.5" standing reach.
    http://www.draftexpress.com/profile/Landry-Fields-5803/
    It took me awhile to read that but good read!

  7. #67
    Raptors Republic Superstar Chr1s1anL's Avatar
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    Quote Blacklash2k4 wrote: View Post
    It took me awhile to read that but good read!
    Yeah long but, good breakdown on Fields game last year.
    @Chr1st1anL

  8. #68
    Raptors Republic Veteran NoPropsneeded's Avatar
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    Quote sleepz wrote: View Post
    They are not easy to obtain, however if we know that these are the type of players needed to create a winner, the top GM's and the type of GM you want running your franchise has to find ways to acquire them via draft, trade or free agency.

    Colangelo has been here 7 YEARS and has not managed to acquire an all-star or even a player approaching all-star talent. He has managed to let a perennial all-star leave and not get anything back for him but his acquisitions have primarily been swapping out average players for other average players.

    If thats the type of GM you want then so be it.

    Some posters here want to see a plan of action to start acquiring players that are going to help you win long-term.

    This is a results driven league and in very few places would a GM be given 7 years to build something of significance and be at the level the Raptor franchise is at now. The roster is 'meh' at best.
    why dont you name me one gm that has done that for the raptors? all these past drafts haven't had a player nearly as good as carter

  9. #69
    Raptors Republic Hall of Famer Matt52's Avatar
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    Quote sleepz wrote: View Post
    They are not easy to obtain, however if we know that these are the type of players needed to create a winner, the top GM's and the type of GM you want running your franchise has to find ways to acquire them via draft, trade or free agency.

    Colangelo has been here 7 YEARS and has not managed to acquire an all-star or even a player approaching all-star talent. He has managed to let a perennial all-star leave and not get anything back for him but his acquisitions have primarily been swapping out average players for other average players.

    If thats the type of GM you want then so be it.

    Some posters here want to see a plan of action to start acquiring players that are going to help you win long-term.

    This is a results driven league and in very few places would a GM be given 7 years to build something of significance and be at the level the Raptor franchise is at now. The roster is 'meh' at best.
    I cannot offer anything that has not been said before.

    You make it sound as if the Raps have drafted top 5 each year for 7 years and have nothing to show. Raps made playoffs 2 years and were 5th seed at ASG before Bosh quit.

    In 2 years since bosh left A team with everyone who matters under 27 except Jose and 2 incoming lottery picks has been assembled. DC is proving to be a phenomenal coach, teacher, and motivator. To get that star player you need lottery luck or assets/cap flexibility to get him. Raps have 2 shots at lottery luck on the roster and assets for trade.

    I like where Raps are and where they are going especIly with the type of impact the new CBA appears to be having (exception is Brooklyn but they are going to be handcuffed. Ext year).

  10. #70
    Raptors Republic Starter mountio's Avatar
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    Quote Phat Farmer wrote: View Post
    So you are saying adding toughness and leadership, to a young team severely lacking in both does nothing for us in the grand scheme of things? That maybe true for the heat given the abundance of talent and experience on the team. I think it did wonders for the players in practice and off the court, which naturally translates onto the court. Jamal was even key in quite a few games where we were getting dismantled by the other team. He may not have come in and dropped 10-15 points, but he was a huge presence for us, both on and off the court and is still of value to us going into this season, especially with JV coming over.
    I couldnt disagree more. We sucked last year and frankly so did JM. I think he might have had a role for a team trying to get over the hump (Indianaish?) .. but for a 20 win team .. toughness and leadership are irrelevant .. espeically when they take playing time away from guys who need to develop (ie Ed).

  11. #71
    Raptors Republic Rookie Phat Farmer's Avatar
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    Quote Matt52 wrote: View Post
    I cannot offer anything that has not been said before.

    You make it sound as if the Raps have drafted top 5 each year for 7 years and have nothing to show. Raps made playoffs 2 years and were 5th seed at ASG before Bosh quit.

    In 2 years since bosh left A team with everyone who matters under 27 except Jose and 2 incoming lottery picks has been assembled. DC is proving to be a phenomenal coach, teacher, and motivator. To get that star player you need lottery luck or assets/cap flexibility to get him. Raps have 2 shots at lottery luck on the roster and assets for trade.

    I like where Raps are and where they are going especIly with the type of impact the new CBA appears to be having (exception is Brooklyn but they are going to be handcuffed. Ext year).
    +1

  12. #72
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    Quote slaw wrote: View Post
    Given all of the talk of flexibility, cap room, hitting the ground running, making the playoffs, etc., this roster is a major disappointment. It's the same basic core of players plus Kyle Lowry. Fields isn't even worth mentioning. I know that for the past 6 years Colangelo has told us it takes big men about 5-6 years to develop in the NBA, well, he better hope that it takes Valanciunas about 5-6 weeks, otherwise, Bryan will be looking for a job next summer.
    Dude,

    Tell me your kidding. Thus far i call this roster a upgrade over the last year no doubt.

    Although the playoff is no guarantee with this roster -- I say we finish 10th-7th spot. Hoping no injuries this year especially to our go to guys...whoever that is.
    but definite upgrade. If you play the two rosters against each other this years team will win no doubt.

    Peace out
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  13. #73
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    It's pretty obvious that the roster has upgraded significantly from last years roster especially in the center, small forward and point guard position. The only thing I have to ask is whether that is really saying anything? I mean our roster last year was pretty "bad", so playoffs is questionable next year. Our roster is gonna have to work hard for a playoff spot, but it's definitely possible. Also, another thought: Is it possible that the reason everyone is disappointed in the off-season is due to all the hype of the possibility of getting either Gay or Iggy to Raptors? I feel like everyone got WAY too excited in the possibility in getting an all-star caliber SF.

  14. #74
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    Quote Phat Farmer wrote: View Post
    +1
    ALL hail MATT52. I couldnt have said it better.

    GO RAPS
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    Raptors Republic All-Star tucas's Avatar
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    The problem is yes philly did get worse and we did get better, but the lottery teams in the east got better aswell. So where Philly drops brooklyn will likely take that spot. Then throw in the bucks who always seem to hover around there, the wizards who have had maybe one of the best offseasons so far and maybe the cavs if they manage to land Bynum.
    That being said raptors have gotten significantly better. I have 0 doubt in my mind that fields' numbers will be better than those of his rookie season. He will be our SF of the future unless we manage to get Igoudala. Lowry is a significant improvement over Calderon and Calderon is an even bigger improvement over bayless. Ross will likely be a more complete player than Demar being able to shoot the ball and defend at a high level. Valanciunas will be a defensive anchor for the team and will help us improve the center position significantly. I have no idea how colangelo could've had a more productive offseason. He addressed all of our team needs and improved us at EVERY position. Just because we didn't get an Allstar SF doesn't mean we wont be a playoff team. We're slowly becoming one of the deepest teams in the league and could be the Denver nuggets of the eastern conference.
    That being said No, I don't think colangelo is looking to build a contending team right now. I feel he is looking to make a playoff team out of the Raptors just so they become relevant and Toronto has a team that fans actually get excited to see again. But it's a process. I dont get how people think the 8th worst team in the league will get so much better to the point that there making it past the 1st or 2nd round in the playoffs in one offseason. I think this year the raptors will get the 8th spot and that's what matters right now. Even if we do get sweeped in the first round
    Also side note I think I'd prefer this deep team that colangelo is building over giving up all our depth to get a player like Iggy. But that's just my opinion.

  16. #76
    Raptors Republic All-Star wallz's Avatar
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    Quote Blacklash2k4 wrote: View Post
    It's pretty obvious that the roster has upgraded significantly from last years roster especially in the center, small forward and point guard position. The only thing I have to ask is whether that is really saying anything? I mean our roster last year was pretty "bad", so playoffs is questionable next year. Our roster is gonna have to work hard for a playoff spot, but it's definitely possible. Also, another thought: Is it possible that the reason everyone is disappointed in the off-season is due to all the hype of the possibility of getting either Gay or Iggy to Raptors? I feel like everyone got WAY too excited in the possibility in getting an all-star caliber SF.
    That's where most of the disappointment is coming from. Trading for stars doesn't always work out people

  17. #77
    Raptors Republic Rookie Nachoooooo's Avatar
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    Let's see, this is how I would rank the Eastern Conference:

    1) Miami
    2) Boston
    3) Indiana
    4) Chicago (Rose will be back for the 2nd half of the season, and they have one heck of a coach)
    5) Brooklyn
    6) Washington (They got the talent)
    7) New York
    8) Atl/Tor

    So yes, we do stand a chance. I believe Atlanta will blow everything apart by the trade deadline.

    Ps... First post, go easy on me mortals!
    Last edited by Nachoooooo; Wed Jul 18th, 2012 at 05:01 PM.

  18. #78
    Raptors Republic All-Star tucas's Avatar
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    Quote Nachoooooo wrote: View Post
    Let's see, this is how I would rank the Eastern Conference:

    1) Miami
    2) Boston
    3) Indiana
    4) Chicago (Rose will be back for the 2nd half of the season, and they have one heck of a coach)
    5) Brooklyn
    6) Washington (They got the talent)
    7) New York
    8) Atl/Tor

    So yes, we do stand a chance. I believe Atlanta will blow everything apart by the trade deadline.
    +1 unless Josh Smith has a superstar year I don't like there chances this year. Also Washington is good but I wouldn't put them that high already. I see them as the team we'll be fighting with for the 8th spot.

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    The thing that amuses me about this thread is that there isn't a lot of disagreement on the small details. Most people seem to agree that JV could take a while to really be an impact player. Most people agree that Lowry is an upgrade over Calderon. Most people agree that we'd do better with a healthy Bargnani for the full year. On Fields there's a really wide range of opinions, so he keeps becoming a focal-point for discussion. I think most people are even in agreement that we're going to be somewhere in 7-11 range in the east next year.
    But there seems to be enormous dispute about whether this is a step in the right direction and that the team is well positioned for acquiring an elite SF, when one does become available; or whether this is a sign that the team is headed for perpetual mediocrity and will never be able to make the acquisitions necessary to take the next step.

  20. #80
    Raptors Republic Superstar planetmars's Avatar
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    Quote Nachoooooo wrote: View Post
    Let's see, this is how I would rank the Eastern Conference:

    1) Miami
    2) Boston
    3) Indiana
    4) Chicago (Rose will be back for the 2nd half of the season, and they have one heck of a coach)
    5) Brooklyn
    6) Washington (They got the talent)
    7) New York
    8) Atl/Tor

    So yes, we do stand a chance. I believe Atlanta will blow everything apart by the trade deadline.
    Philly was kicking ass last year, and ended up in 8th. I can see them having another good season next year even though they have Kwame Brown on their roster.

    I think Cleveland improved. They may even get Bynum if the Howard saga finally ends. So don't rule them out.

    Detroit may get better as well. If the Monroe/Drummond tandem works and if Knight improves.. that could be a heck of a team.

    Atlanta still has Smith, and Horford was injured practically all of last year. Even though Joe Johnson is gone, they would still have a decent team.

    It's not going to be easy for Toronto. But I'm putting a lot of faith in Casey

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