Quote ebrian wrote: View Post
I don't think we're set at SG either, so there's no reason to be removing SG's. We need one just as bad as we need a SF, although granted we did a SG. But Casey has said multiple times now that SG/SF is fairly interchangeable in his offense. Not one of those guys I listed are making more than Fields, and quite a few of them are far more proven than he is. Fields to me is a bit of a question mark as to who he really is.. Y1 or Y2. Hopefully, that first year is more reflective of the type of player he'll be for the Raptors.

Brandon Rush just signed for $8M over 2 years. Another bargain basement price that makes Landry Fields' contract look bad.
There are 48 minutes per game at SG. The Raps have DeRozan and Ross with Fields able to play SG and the Raps able to match up in small ball with Lowry and Calderon on the floor together (albeit for very small stretches, in my opinion). Plus the Raptors signed Andersen as a third string. From my perspective, I call that set...... for now. The talent is certainly not all-NBA but from the perspective of Casey's system and the Raptors continuing evolution, I'd rate it as an improvement over this time last year at the very least. There is the possibility Ross becomes something. Also DeRozan is a free agent after this season and should he fail to impress yet again, the Raps will have the ability to offer up to a max contract to a SG/SF/wing this summer (I'm going to say what everyone else has already said or is thinking: James Harden).

With regards to Rush, he was also a free agent of Golden State. Of course, they got a good deal on him. No team was willing to overpay to get him. Golden State did not have to worry about the salary cap in resigning him because he was their own. If another team really wanted him, they'd have to throw a contract similar to Fields at him. I understand and agree with the gripe on the contract but it is hardly an apples to apples comparison in my opinion. Getting restricted free agents from another team is much different than resigning your own restricted free agents.