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Thread: Shame On All Raps Fans who cheered For Lakers!

  1. #21
    Raptors Republic All-Star Sig's Avatar
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    Quote Nilanka wrote: View Post
    It's obvious that some folks place ethnicity over the local sports team. I just don't understand why anyone would do that.

    I certainly don't cheer for Tristan Thompson when he's in town because while wearing a Cavs jersey, he represents Cleveland (not Canada).
    Hopefully you don't take this the wrong way, but you probably don't understand what it's like because you're either westernized or were born here in North America to a family that's been here for a while.

    Canadian pride isn't really as genuine compared to other countries IMO, because countries like Canada are a variety of different cultures mixed together into one. Unlike others where there is for the most part; one dominant ethnicity. This makes it a little awkward in terms of... how should I say... "categorization"?

    This is difficult to explain in a way in which it won't offend anyone so I'd rather not continue lol. I think you catch my drift.

  2. #22
    Raptors Republic Superstar heinz57's Avatar
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    Quote Sig wrote: View Post
    Hopefully you don't take this the wrong way, but you probably don't understand what it's like because you're either westernized or were born here in North America to a family that's been here for a while.

    Canadian pride isn't really as genuine compared to other countries IMO, because countries like Canada are a variety of different cultures mixed together into one. Unlike others where there is for the most part; one dominant ethnicity. This makes it a little awkward in terms of... how should I say... "categorization"?

    This is difficult to explain in a way in which it won't offend anyone so I'd rather not continue lol. I think you catch my drift.
    i'm somewhat a child of the world... i've moved around a fair bit during my life... i've seen fandom in it's various forms...

    and can honestly tell you..

    if Liverpool FC was playing a game in Madrid... the amount of Liverpool shirts in the stands would be miniscule compared to the amount of jeremy lin jerseys at a raps game... and Pepe Reina is FROM Madrid.. AND their national team GK

    if you walked into my local with anything but liverpool colours... the easiest you'd get off is being forcibly removed from the premises..

    hell, if you wore a suarez uruguay shirt you'd get the boot..

    club and country are two completely different beasts

  3. #23
    Raptors Republic Superstar BasketballCrush's Avatar
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    The most insecure fans always gravitate to the dynasty's. They feel that that others judge by them by the colours they wear. Miami heat jersey is cool all of a sudden but you hardly saw those way back in the day. Weird that Cavs jersey has gone out of fashion so quick.


    Take all the people who cheered for the Lakers at the ACC, and give them a basketball quiz, you will find their knowledge of the league is superficial, and their fandom is just about image rather than substance. (Exact same reason why Lin fans were packing the ACC against NY)

  4. #24
    Super Moderator CalgaryRapsFan's Avatar
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    Quote BasketballCrush wrote: View Post
    The most insecure fans always gravitate to the dynasty's. They feel that that others judge by them by the colours they wear. Miami heat jersey is cool all of a sudden but you hardly saw those way back in the day. Weird that Cavs jersey has gone out of fashion so quick.


    Take all the people who cheered for the Lakers at the ACC, and give them a basketball quiz, you will find their knowledge of the league is superficial, and their fandom is just about image rather than substance. (Exact same reason why Lin fans were packing the ACC against NY)
    Not only that, but how many people (especially kids under 25) wear popular team gear, who are not really fans of either the team or even the sport?

    I think that's why the ethnic issue often pops up (ie: Lin fans at Raptors games), in a way that completely supercedes cheering for a specific team/town. I would be willing to bet that most of those fans were just rallying to support 'one of their own' who was the most hyped individual around the world at the time. I don't take it personally as a Raptors fan, because they are not a true representation of a Toronto/Canadian basketball and/or Raptors fan.

  5. #25
    Raptors Republic Superstar planetmars's Avatar
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    For the die hard fans - sport is almost like a religion. To have another person enter your place of worship only to praise another religion will piss you off (and in some parts of the world get you killed).

    For a regular fan - sport is entertainment. It's a way to escape real life and enjoy other people doing amazing things. People like a feel good story or someone they can relate with doing something special. Jeremy Lin was a fantastic story and got a lot of people excited. The Lakers are a big source of entertainment (and have been for a long time).

    When I started watching basketball it was because I was entertained. I loved what Jordan did and am still amazed by that and will never forget it. He is the reason I became a fan and ultimately became a fan of the Bulls because he was playing for them. Once Toronto got a franchise and Jordan was moving towards retirement I became a fan of the Raptors because I was a local and it was a team I could easily gravitate towards. I eventually became a die-hard fan (well maybe not to the point that I would kill someone for not liking my team) but enough that I would go to a blog and post about the team I like on a regular basis.

    I understand both sides. Nothing wrong with either.

  6. #26
    Raptors Republic Veteran Nilanka's Avatar
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    Quote CalgaryRapsFan wrote: View Post
    Not only that, but how many people (especially kids under 25) wear popular team gear, who are not really fans of either the team or even the sport?

    I think that's why the ethnic issue often pops up (ie: Lin fans at Raptors games), in a way that completely supercedes cheering for a specific team/town. I would be willing to bet that most of those fans were just rallying to support 'one of their own' who was the most hyped individual around the world at the time. I don't take it personally as a Raptors fan, because they are not a true representation of a Toronto/Canadian basketball and/or Raptors fan.
    You're right, those fans aren't a true representation of the Raptors fan base. It's just embarrassing to see/hear those fans cheer louder than the real fans, and have this highlighted all over U.S. media outlets.
    "I don't lie. I willfully participate in a campaign of misinformation." - Fox Mulder

  7. #27
    Super Moderator CalgaryRapsFan's Avatar
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    Quote planetmars wrote: View Post
    For the die hard fans - sport is almost like a religion. To have another person enter your place of worship only to praise another religion will piss you off (and in some parts of the world get you killed).

    For a regular fan - sport is entertainment. It's a way to escape real life and enjoy other people doing amazing things. People like a feel good story or someone they can relate with doing something special. Jeremy Lin was a fantastic story and got a lot of people excited. The Lakers are a big source of entertainment (and have been for a long time).

    When I started watching basketball it was because I was entertained. I loved what Jordan did and am still amazed by that and will never forget it. He is the reason I became a fan and ultimately became a fan of the Bulls because he was playing for them. Once Toronto got a franchise and Jordan was moving towards retirement I became a fan of the Raptors because I was a local and it was a team I could easily gravitate towards. I eventually became a die-hard fan (well maybe not to the point that I would kill someone for not liking my team) but enough that I would go to a blog and post about the team I like on a regular basis.

    I understand both sides. Nothing wrong with either.
    Nice post, agree 100%.

    The bolded paragraph describes me just as well as it describes you! All my elementary school friends were supporting Magic's Lakers, Larry's Celtics, Isaiah's Pistons or even Dominique's Hawks... I gravitated to the high flying, up and coming star in the making... MJ! I remember getting ripped by my friends as MJ's Bulls lost to the 'Bad Boys' out of Detroit in the conference finals in consecutive seasons, but I got the last laugh as the first Bulls three-peat began the following season!

    As Raptors fans, should we negatively judge any fan for sticking with a team they supported prior to the Raptors franchise coming into existence? Or should we tar & feather any young fans who newly discover the NBA and are drawn to the hype machine players who are paraded on US networks, in magazines and all over the internet? We live in a digital era in a global village, so why should we automatically force fans (especially young and/or new fans) to support their hometown team, considering not a single player on that team is actually from the town (or even country) they play in???
    Last edited by CalgaryRapsFan; Wed Jan 23rd, 2013 at 12:18 PM.

  8. #28
    Super Moderator CalgaryRapsFan's Avatar
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    Quote Nilanka wrote: View Post
    You're right, those fans aren't a true representation of the Raptors fan base. It's just embarrassing to see/hear those fans cheer louder than the real fans, and have this highlighted all over U.S. media outlets.
    True. However, I seem to recall this being a common phenomenon wherever the Knicks played, not just in Toronto.

    You can go to a Jays game against many old teams that were around long before the Jays were (ie: NY, Boston) or against teams within driving distance (ie: Cleveland), and see a huge number of fans supporting the visitors. It's not even just a basketball thing.

    If the minority of fans are out-cheering the hometown fans, I put that more on the hometown fans (especially bad in Toronto, given the number of corporate 'fans' who are too busy in their platinum sweets or on their crackberries to actually cheer or even pay attention).

  9. #29
    Raptors Republic Rookie Paradigm Shift's Avatar
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    Quote planetmars wrote: View Post

    When I started watching basketball it was because I was entertained. I loved what Jordan did and am still amazed by that and will never forget it. He is the reason I became a fan and ultimately became a fan of the Bulls because he was playing for them. Once Toronto got a franchise and Jordan was moving towards retirement I became a fan of the Raptors because I was a local and it was a team I could easily gravitate towards. I eventually became a die-hard fan (well maybe not to the point that I would kill someone for not liking my team) but enough that I would go to a blog and post about the team I like on a regular basis.
    ...and so you may, depending on how young you were at the time (elementary school), remember that coverage of the NBA was miniscule in those days. I remember going to the Orange Julep in Montreal and sitting with friends listening to the NBA championship on a scratchy NY radio station in the car. The game was not shown live, only on tape delay after the 11:00 nightly news. When Magic came into the league, they promoted "The Magic Show" and broadcast his first pro game. It was unheard, at the time, of that the networks would show a basketball game before the football season had ended.

    Around that time, the NBA changed its marketing strategy and started focusing on its stars, Magic, Bird and eventually, MJ. Stern, for all the crap he takes, road that strategy successfully. I have seen over the years articles/discussions about the downside of focusing on players as opposed to teams. I think the discussion here is one symptom of that strategy, where Lin is bigger than the Rockets.... and maybe even bigger than Raptors in Toronto.

  10. #30
    Super Moderator CalgaryRapsFan's Avatar
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    Quote Paradigm Shift wrote: View Post
    ...and so you may, depending on how young you were at the time (elementary school), remember that coverage of the NBA was miniscule in those days. I remember going to the Orange Julep in Montreal and sitting with friends listening to the NBA championship on a scratchy NY radio station in the car. The game was not shown live, only on tape delay after the 11:00 nightly news. When Magic came into the league, they promoted "The Magic Show" and broadcast his first pro game. It was unheard, at the time, of that the networks would show a basketball game before the football season had ended.

    Around that time, the NBA changed its marketing strategy and started focusing on its stars, Magic, Bird and eventually, MJ. Stern, for all the crap he takes, road that strategy successfully. I have seen over the years articles/discussions about the downside of focusing on players as opposed to teams. I think the discussion here is one symptom of that strategy, where Lin is bigger than the Rockets.... and maybe even bigger than Raptors in Toronto.
    I fully agree that it was a great strategy to grow the popularity of the game worldwide. However, with the league now operating with global popularity and a growing backlash against overpaid, spoiled sports stars from the average joe, I'm just a little surprised/disappointed that the NBA hasn't curtailed this approach. The star players will always be further marketed through endorsement deals, but the league itself should be supporting and promoting the franchises, not just the superstars. I think this practice is what has led to the two-tiered reffing that seems to dominate today's NBA game and the have and have-nots among NBA cities, unfortunately.

  11. #31
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    Quote Nilanka wrote: View Post
    You're right, those fans aren't a true representation of the Raptors fan base. It's just embarrassing to see/hear those fans cheer louder than the real fans, and have this highlighted all over U.S. media outlets.
    To me, the only embarrassing thing is the so-called real fans who did not purchase tickets are somehow embarrassed by the actions of fans who support the financial well-being of the Raptors with their money.

    I believe in the One True God, I guess.

    Some things never change.

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