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Kyle Lowry sets Raptors record with 22 4th-quarter points

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Here’s a comprehensive list of things that Kyle Lowry is under:

That’s it, that’s the entirely list. Because Kyle Lowry Over Everything, including a bout of flu-like symptoms that shut him down for the final four minutes of the second quarter.

When Lowry hit the locker room with tummy troubles, it seemed a prudent idea to sit him down, let him rest up for the second half of the back-to-back in Toronto tomorrow, and let Cory Joseph and Delon Wright try to lead the unlikely charge back from a 46-32 halftime deficit. That’s not really Lowry’s modus operandi, though, and not only did he come out for blood on offense in the second half, he also spent a good chunk of time chasing Kyle Korver around a never-ending array of screens.

I’m burying the lede here, as if I’m afraid it’s going to come back to life as a zombie and I don’t want it to be able to break through any amount of ground. Let’s try again:

GOOD SHAMMGOD ALMIGHTY THAT FOURTH QUARTER FROM KYLE LOWRY.

Lowry went insane in the fourth, setting a new Raptors franchise record for points in a quarter with 22. That tops Lou Williams’ 21 from March of last year against the Cleveland Cavaliers and quickly jumps near the top of an already robust list of top Kyle Lowry performances.

He shot 7-of-8 in the quarter, hit his lone triple, and lived at the line, going 7-of-8. He also grabbed three rebounds and dished two assists, helping turn a nine-point deficit entering the quarter (and a 17-point one halfway through the third) into a 10-point victory. He finished with a 31-5-5 line overall, added a pair of steals, and wound up playing 37 minutes despite the illness.

Here’s a fun stat:


It was awesome. Kyle Lowry Over Everything, man.

Here’s a fun debate: Where does Lowry rank among all-time Raptors already? Vince and Bosh are 1-2 in some order, but No. 3 opens up to DeRozan (longevity), Stouadmire (overall impact), McGrady (talent), Calderon (shut up), and Lowry. His short tenure matters less when you have so few long-tenured players in history (Amir Johnson is everywhere in the team record books), and he’s had arguably the highest peak of anyone not named Carter or Bosh.

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